Final Grace Rests Easily Where Sin Once Sat from Romans, Part 14

Let me conclude this series on grace with an illustration of the truth we have just examined and how this is grace at work in us.

Mitsuo Fuchida grew up loving his native Japan and hating the United States, which treated Asian immigrants harshly in the first half of the twentieth century. Fuchida attended a military academy, joined Japan’s Naval Air Force, and by 1941, with 10,000 flying hours behind him, had established himself as the nation’s top pilot. When Japanese military leaders needed someone to command a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, they chose Fuchida.

Fuchida’s was the voice that sent his aircraft carrier the message “Tora! Tora! Tora!” (Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!) indicating the success of the surprise mission. Later, he too was surprised when he learned that, of the 70 officers who participated in the raid, he was the only one who returned alive. He had another close call when he was shot down during the battle of Midway in 1942, but despite serious injuries, he survived again.


By 1945 he had attained the position of the Imperial Navy’s Air Operations Officer. On August 6 he was eating breakfast in Nara, Japan,
where a new military headquarters was under construction, when he heard about a bomb dropped on Hiroshima. He flew to investigate, then sent a grim report to the Imperial Command.

On the same day, an American POW named Jacob DeShazer felt moved by the Holy Spirit to pray for peace. DeShazer had been in captivity since 1942, when, as a member of Doolittle’s Raiders, he had dropped bombs near Tokyo and then was forced to parachute into China. While imprisoned, first in Nanjing and later in Beijing, DeShazer had become a Christian. He found his heart softened toward his Japanese captors. After being liberated, DeShazer wrote a widely distributed essay, “I Was a Prisoner of the Japanese,” detailing his experiences of capture, conversion, and forgiveness.

Fuchida and DeShazer met in 1950. DeShazer had returned to Japan in 1948 as a missionary. Fuchida had read DeShazer’s testimony, bought a Bible, and converted from Buddhism to Christianity. DeShazer had recently finished a 40-day fast for revival in Japan when Fuchida came to his home and introduced himself. DeShazer welcomed the new convert and encouraged him to be baptized. While DeShazer continued to plant churches throughout Japan, Fuchida became an evangelist, spreading a message of peace and forgiveness in his native country and throughout Asian-American communities.

Fuchida died on May 30, 1976. Like dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel, who wished his legacy to be one of peace rather than destruction, Fuchida wanted the message of his changed heart to supersede the memory of his infamous attack. He wrote, “That morning [December 7] . . . I lifted the curtain of warfare by dispatching that cursed order, and I put my whole effort into the war that followed. . . . [But] after buying and reading the Bible, my mind was strongly impressed and captivated. I think I can say today without hesitation that God’s grace has been set upon me.”  [Elesha Coffman, “Beyond Pearl Harbor,” Christian History Online Newsletter (6-01-01); submitted by Kevin Miller; Wheaton, Illinois]

How does faith come to and grow in a person.  By God’s Word!  Paul tells us in Romans 10:17, “Faith comes by hearing the message and the message is heard by the word of Christ.”

God’s word, given to the unbeliever that does not resist the Word, works in their heart and mind and they come to believe in Jesus and convert to Christ, but that’s not all, the word continues to develop faith as the Word continues in their life.

God’s grace saves, but his grace does so much more than save, it transforms, protects, and develops and grows faith and hope, and life.

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Boy Am I Blessed!

It is not hard to become a Christian. You hear the Gospel of Jesus and when you believe the Gospel, you have faith in Christ (Romans 10:14-17). Then when you have met the conditions (faith; Romans 10:9-10; repentance; Acts 2:38; confession: Romans 10:9-10, & baptism; Acts 2:38; 1 Peter 3:21), then you are saved, God has saved you because you have identified with Christ through his death (that’s what immersion is for, cf., Romans 6:1-6). That’s the easy part, knowing what to do, but, it can be more difficult for some people to come to the point of belief, or repentance. It can be difficult to let go of what we already know and keep ourselves living in the that way which the Bible describes as sinful and worldly and idolatry.

Once I am saved, when I have become a Christian, well things are new. The Bible even calls it a new life (Romans 12:2; 2 Corinthians 4:16). I am not who I was. I have a brand new life, I start over. If I simply keep living the way I had before, then I am not different just a little older. But with salvation in Christ, with the Holy Spirit in my life, with God’s Word the Bible leading me, then I am being transformed, renewed (Rom. 12:2) into the likeness of Christ.

At least one time, when there was a huge crowd of people, Jesus taught them. In Matthew 5, he was on a mountain in Galilee and began to teach the crowds. He began with the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-16).

Each “Beatitude” begins with “Blessed are…” meaning, “joyful are those who….”

This is what it is like to live in Christ, to be a Christian, to have life.

  • It is a joyful thing to realize you are poor in your spirit and you need God. It is joyful because God’s kingdom is in us; Mt. 5:3
  • It is a joyful thing to mourn that you are a sinner, because God’s salvation will bring you comfort; Mt. 5:4
  • It is a joyful thing to be meek. Gentle in character but firm in conviction; you will “inherit the earth,” fill it with joy; Mt. 5:5
  • It is a joyful thing to hunger and thirst for righteousness, because you will have; Mt. 5:6
  • It is a joyful thing to be merciful, you’ll get mercy back and from God; Mt. 5:7
  • It is a joyful thing to have a pure heart, you are going to get to see God because of it; Mt. 5:8
  • It is joyful when you are a peacemaker, that’s what the children of God do; Mt. 5:9
  • It is a joyful thing when people persecute you because of your righteousness, it means you are in the kingdom and people who hate God hate Christ in you and will try to insult and stop you; Mt. 5:10-13

This is spiritual of course. It plays out here in the material world with the sense that God’s kingdom is expressed in and through your life.

This is the character of those who are saved. Not one or another of the Beatitudes, but all of them together. It’s like the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22). It’s not one or two things, it’s all of them at once that make up the produce of your life.

Why am I blessed? I am blessed because I have salvation, I have God in my life and Christ is leading me by the means of his Spirit. I have heaven and a great reward, now and in the future (John 10:10, “life abundant”).

Boy am I blessed!

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Am I Really Like This? (Romans Pt. 9)

A few years after I accepted Christ and was baptized, I began to experience a sense of guilt. I got my dad alone and told him I thought I needed to be baptized again.

I have to tell you that my dad was an elder at our church then and my dad was and is a man of wisdom. He studies God’s word. He learns and grows in understanding. I was 13 or 14 and he gave me some of the best advice and understanding I’ve ever received. Dad knew that there is only one baptism (Ephesians 4:4-6) and that I had been baptized for the forgiveness of my sins and salvation (Acts 2:38, and 1 Peter 3:21 ). He was there when I asked what I needed to do to be saved. He was there when I was baptized and shared in the prayer my preacher gave right after I was immersed. Dad knew the correct answer to my dilemma.

I needed to repent. I didn’t need to be baptized again (some call it rebaptism – it’s unheard of in the Bible). I just needed to repent. To determine to change and to live out the change into holiness.

Listen to Paul’s explanation of what we often title this section, “The Conflict of the Two Natures” . . . Romans 7:14-25

“14For we know that the Law is spiritual, but I am of flesh, sold into bondage to sin. 15For what I am doing, I do not understand; for I am not practicing what I would like to do, but I am doing the very thing I hate. 16But if I do the very thing I do not want to do, I agree with the Law, confessing that the Law is good. 17So now, no longer am I the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. 18For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh; for the willing is present in me, but the doing of the good is not. 19For the good that I want, I do not do, but I practice the very evil that I do not want. 20But if I am doing the very thing I do not want, I am no longer the one doing it, but sin which dwells in me. 21I find then the principle that evil is present in me, the one who wants to do good. 22For I joyfully concur with the law of God in the inner man, 23but I see a different law in the members of my body, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin which is in my members. 24Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death? 25Thanks be to God through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, on the one hand I myself with my mind am serving the law of God, but on the other, with my flesh the law of sin,” NASB (Check out the New Living Translation; http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Romans%207:14-25&version=NLT ).

Here’s the problem. We are human beings living in the material (fleshly) world. There are sinful, worldly, “fleshly” forces that tempt us and work on our knowledge of what sin is. It’s kind of like this. You walk by a park bench that’s just been painted and there is a sign that says, “Stay off. Wet Paint!’ What is your first inclination? Either you want to touch it to see if it is wet, or you want to touch it because it says, “Stay off!.” Being a little rebellious and disobedient.

We do the things we know we’re not supposed to do and we don’t do the things we know we ought to do. There is a struggle. We are saved by God’s grace (Ephesians 2:8). We have the Holy Spirit of God in us (Acts 2:38). But we are still living in this imperfect, sinful world until Jesus comes back. We are going to struggle. It will be difficult to keep from returning to the way of sin. Even Paul, who I thought when I was a teen was able to totally keep from sinning, struggled with doing what is right and not doing what is wrong.

Click on picture to enlarge

We’re supposed to be __________________. You can fill in the blank with words like, holy, righteous, perfected, etc.

If we have to struggle with what we were losing at in the first place because of sin, how is it possible to become what God wants me to become?

This is where you read Romans 8 and learn that God is at work in you and that is how you overcome the power of temptation and sin. Follow this link: http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=romans%208&version=NASB

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This is What it Means to be Saved

You and I can talk all day about the conditions that lead to salvation and eternal life. It does need to be discussed. It IS important to know what must happen in your life and mine for us to gain salvation from God through Jesus Christ (Acts 4:12). We’ve dealt with these conditions before here (click on Salvation Stuff in the menu to the left).

What has got to happen in my life, what are the conditions that make it possible for God to save me?

I believe in Jesus. John 3:16; Romans 10:10&11). I believe that God sent Jesus and that he is the Son of God and that God raised him from the dead. This is the beginning of discipleship. Every person that has ever been saved were saved because they believed that Jesus is the Christ. They have faith in God and in Christ and in the things of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. BELIEF, that’s one.

I have to repent of my sin, Acts 2:38; Acts 17:30. If God is going to change me, because I am letting him, belief is opening the door and repentance is letting God in to clean out the mess that sin is. Repentance is as Gareth Reese says [“New Testament History, Acts,” College Press Publishing, Joplin, MO, 1976, page 145-147], “individual, inclusive, and indispensable.” Repentance is done by and found in individuals, and it is for everyone (inclusive) and salvation cannot happen without repentance (indispensable). It involves my intellect, knowledge of sin, a change in my emotions, I must feel the sense of guilt that I possess and be sorrowful for it, and it involves a change of my will, letting God take over my messed up life to make things right in my life. REPENTANCE is another.

I must confess Christ, Romans 10:10-11. If I have let change come into my life, it’s got to show. I have to say it. I have to let it out that I believe in Jesus and that I have made him my Lord and Christ (Acts 2:36), that I belong to him, I am a C-H-R-I-S-T-I-A-N. This is a continual thing. It doesn’t happen only once, it is constant. I belong to Christ, I declare that I am his by my lifestyle and my message of faith. CONFESSION, that’s a third one.

I must be baptized, Acts 2:38; Romans 6:16; 1 Peter 3:21. Baptism is immersion. That is what the word actually means and it is the only form that the church practiced with the apostles. I must submit myself in humility to baptism in order that God will forgive me of my sins and give me salvation. It all happens when we come in contact with Jesus’ death and resurrection by our own death and resurrection. We are buried in baptism and raised from the water with new life. Pretty cool concept. A new life, a fresh start that propels me on my way to heaven. BAPTIZED, that a fourth one.

But is that what it means to be saved? Those are the conditions that make it possible for God to save us, but what it means to be saved is to be different. Not different for the sake of being different, but different as in changed and being formed into the likeness of Christ.

You were created in God’s image (Genesis 1:26-27). Sin distorted that image (it’s in your soul). Sin corrupted the goodness that is in you, it robbed you of innocence as God is good and innocence, you have no righteousness, but Jesus brings the change that will restore you to God’s good graces. He is God come to earth (Matthew 1:23; Colossians 1:15–16). And when we are saved through Christ, we are renewed. He refreshes that original image of God that we possess.

That means how we live, think, and act is totally different from the ways of the world. We possess the goodness and righteousness of God and do right and good and kindness in this world. We live holy as God is holy, without sin, with the power of God. We are saved and eternal life with God the Father is our home. We get to be with God because when we have met the conditions in our lives, where our heart, mind, and soul are prepared to accept Christ, then God saves us.

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Not Disappointed (Romans Pt 7)

Ok, you’ve been forgiven of sin, freed from guilt and feeling guilty. No one can accuse you of sin and wrong and be able to convict you. What’s that mean?

I like it when stress is pretty much nil, when I don’t have anything to hassle with. Since sin is so bad it is much more than just a hassle, it is a major problem. A problem so huge that I can’t get over it. Everything I’ve done, lied, stolen, lusted, hated, been insensitive to others, well, they all weigh on my heart and soul. I may not remember each specific individual incident, but I know that I’ve done those and other things.

I am guilty. I feel it. And the one that I have to answer too will hold me accountable to what I’ve done . . .  unless, I can have all this sin removed from me. If that happens, I have nothing to hassle with because no one has a case against me, they cannot accuse me of the wrong.

By the blood of Jesus applied to my life through my faith in Jesus I have been forgiven by God. Meaning, I am no longer guilty. God doesn’t hold it against me. So I get peace.

Therefore since we have been justified through faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” Romans 5:1.

If God doesn’t hold it against me anymore, than God and I are at peace with each other and I have nothing to feel guilty about anymore. I am free. I have been saved from God’s wrath (5:9). The penalty for sin is death (6:23). That word death is describing what is known as spiritual death which is eternal separation from God.

This opens up a whole new world for me. I have been cleansed from my sin by Christ’s blood. I have been given the gift of grace by God through Jesus’s death. I have been justified and declared not guilty. I am no longer judged by the written law, but by the law of faith. My faith in Jesus saves me and I am not disappointed because I am free.

I work in a juvenile detention facility, a temporary jail for teens who have broken the law. When they are locked up, they have lost their civil rights because they have violated the law that protects society to from wrong-doers. They are confined to a limited area, they are restricted in their interaction with others. They have more rules to follow or they receive more restrictions than before, in fact, they will be removed from the general population and restricted to their individual cell.

When they are released, they are free to interact in our society as long as they keep the rules. Breaking the rules takes away their freedom.

When we sin, our souls are in bondage to sin and removed from God’s presence. We are bound away from interaction with God, until we come to him in repentance through belief in his Son Jesus Christ who died to pay for our sins (5:9-20). When God gives us this gift of grace, we are free to live without sin. We are free to live in relation to Him. What a great gift!

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Conditions

Do a search. You'll find 16 things that the NT says saves you.

I learned from Robin Sigers that the New Testament tells us that there are 16 things that saves us.  Four of those things you do.  Actually, you have help in doing them, help from God himself, he is involved in these four things with you.  These are not steps of salvation. These are conditions which place us in the very hand of God because of the heart of God who has chosen to save us by grace through faith.

The first condition is FAITH. “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for and the conviction of things not seen,” Heb. 11:1.  “Without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and rewards those who earnestly seek him” Heb. 11:6. What do

You gotta have faith!

you think.  Faith is essential.  Now God works in our lives so that faith can be instilled in us, faith in God, faith in Jesus the Son of God.  Faith that Jesus is the Son of God and that God has raised him from the dead.  Faith that holds onto truth, reality, and fact.

Faith is foundational. If we are building a house, faith is the foundation.  Everything else it built on it.  You got to have faith!

Another condition of salvation, one of those things you are involved in deciding and doing, is REPENTANCE.  Jesus told us, “But unless you repent, you too will perish,” and “But unless you repent, you too will perish,” Luke 13:3 & 5.

Repent means to turn, to hate sin and turn away from sin.  It’s really that simple.  Though understanding and realizing that is simple, a lot of times, it’s not that simple to do. It implies a trust in God because there is going to be a major change in my life.

Since faith is the foundation, repentance is the framing, the 2×4’s and 2×6’s and such.  The structure of the house.

I have to turn to God, away from sin, I have to pronounce that I hate sin, I have to tell people that I am a sinner and my heart is conditioned than to receive God’s grace in Jesus Christ.

And I must CONFESS.  What must I confess?  Usually in church, when someone presents themselves for baptism, we ask them to

Confess Jesus is Lord and Christ

confess their faith in Jesus.  Often, mostly, we will say the Good Confession, Peter’s confession of Matthew 16:16, “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God.” This is true, but we should be making the Great Confession.  Thomas, doubting Thomas made this confession.  when Jesus appeared to the disciples a second time, Thomas was with them than and he saw Jesus and said, “My Lord and My God,” John 20:28.

Our confession is commitment.  Are we committing to let Christ take control of our lives.  With the Great Commission we will.

Faith is the foundation, and repentance is the framing, confession is the outside, the brick, the siding, the stucco of the walls that people see, seeing the beauty of our life in Christ.

The other condition for salvation is BAPTISM.  Baptism is immersion, not sprinkling or pouring, or some spiritual symbol, it is literally being immersed under the water.

One of the Biblical uses of Baptism/Immersion is when they would have the cloth and it was grungy looking, they would dip it in a solution and it would come out white as could be.  That is the picture we need of baptism.  Jesus told his disciples to make disciples and “to baptize them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit,” Matt. 28:19. Peter told the people on the day of Pentecost to “repent and be baptized for the forgiveness of your sins,”

Jesus says you must be immersed.

Acts 2:38. Peter again tells us that “baptism now saves us, not the washing away of dirt from the body, but an appeal toward God for a clear conscience,” 1 Peter 3:21. Baptism is where, due to the activity of faith, we come into contact with the blood of Jesus and God washes our sins away.  It is when salvation begins in my life.

Faith is the foundation, repentance the framing, and confession the outside of the house. Than Baptism is moving into that house.  Let’s get a new address and move into heaven not hell.

I want to be saved.  These four conditions are what I am involved in as a thinking and choosing person.  Choosing faith in Jesus and choosing to obey the God of creation, so that I will come into a personal and loving relationship with a loving and caring Father who wants to live with me.  There are other things that save me, God’s grace, standing firm, and more, but there are four things that I am involved in with God whereby I must be saved.

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The Thief on the Cross

Jesus and the repenting thief

When we talk about salvation, one of the questions that comes up a lot is about the thief on the cross.  He wasn’t baptized.  Since he wasn’t baptized, is baptism really necessary?

Some of the key aspects of “rightly dividing” (2 Timothy 2:15) the Word of God involves understanding when something happened or was taught and it’s relationship to the whole of the subject as well as taking all of what the Bible says about any given topic.

Let me illustrate this in a silly way.

“All bald men are going to heaven!”  Bold statement for sure.  I love Leviticus 13:40.  It states; “If a man loses the hair of his head, he is bald, he is clean.”

Being clean, or cleansed is a justification that God gives to the sinner.  Freed from sin, cleansed from unrighteousness.  Understanding that we can therefore say, if a man is bald, he is saved.

Now there are several problems with this, besides the comedy and stupidity factor.  It was taken out of context; the immediate context of Leviticus 13 and the book of Leviticus.  These are the laws of God and understanding of the ways of God and chapter 13 is specifically about leprosy and not spiritual cleansing.

The correct understanding of Leviticus 13:40 is, just because some guy is bald, does not necessarily mean he has leprosy.  It just means he lost his hair.

Applying scripture willy-nilly, out of context, with various biases will lead to warped understandings and the development of false doctrines.  So what about the thief on the cross?

Read this article by Robert R. Taylor, Jr. about the thief on the cross.  I think it will enlighten you.

http://www.scripturessay.com/printpage.php?id=748

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