Final Grace Rests Easily Where Sin Once Sat from Romans, Part 14

Let me conclude this series on grace with an illustration of the truth we have just examined and how this is grace at work in us.

Mitsuo Fuchida grew up loving his native Japan and hating the United States, which treated Asian immigrants harshly in the first half of the twentieth century. Fuchida attended a military academy, joined Japan’s Naval Air Force, and by 1941, with 10,000 flying hours behind him, had established himself as the nation’s top pilot. When Japanese military leaders needed someone to command a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, they chose Fuchida.

Fuchida’s was the voice that sent his aircraft carrier the message “Tora! Tora! Tora!” (Tiger! Tiger! Tiger!) indicating the success of the surprise mission. Later, he too was surprised when he learned that, of the 70 officers who participated in the raid, he was the only one who returned alive. He had another close call when he was shot down during the battle of Midway in 1942, but despite serious injuries, he survived again.


By 1945 he had attained the position of the Imperial Navy’s Air Operations Officer. On August 6 he was eating breakfast in Nara, Japan,
where a new military headquarters was under construction, when he heard about a bomb dropped on Hiroshima. He flew to investigate, then sent a grim report to the Imperial Command.

On the same day, an American POW named Jacob DeShazer felt moved by the Holy Spirit to pray for peace. DeShazer had been in captivity since 1942, when, as a member of Doolittle’s Raiders, he had dropped bombs near Tokyo and then was forced to parachute into China. While imprisoned, first in Nanjing and later in Beijing, DeShazer had become a Christian. He found his heart softened toward his Japanese captors. After being liberated, DeShazer wrote a widely distributed essay, “I Was a Prisoner of the Japanese,” detailing his experiences of capture, conversion, and forgiveness.

Fuchida and DeShazer met in 1950. DeShazer had returned to Japan in 1948 as a missionary. Fuchida had read DeShazer’s testimony, bought a Bible, and converted from Buddhism to Christianity. DeShazer had recently finished a 40-day fast for revival in Japan when Fuchida came to his home and introduced himself. DeShazer welcomed the new convert and encouraged him to be baptized. While DeShazer continued to plant churches throughout Japan, Fuchida became an evangelist, spreading a message of peace and forgiveness in his native country and throughout Asian-American communities.

Fuchida died on May 30, 1976. Like dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel, who wished his legacy to be one of peace rather than destruction, Fuchida wanted the message of his changed heart to supersede the memory of his infamous attack. He wrote, “That morning [December 7] . . . I lifted the curtain of warfare by dispatching that cursed order, and I put my whole effort into the war that followed. . . . [But] after buying and reading the Bible, my mind was strongly impressed and captivated. I think I can say today without hesitation that God’s grace has been set upon me.”  [Elesha Coffman, “Beyond Pearl Harbor,” Christian History Online Newsletter (6-01-01); submitted by Kevin Miller; Wheaton, Illinois]

How does faith come to and grow in a person.  By God’s Word!  Paul tells us in Romans 10:17, “Faith comes by hearing the message and the message is heard by the word of Christ.”

God’s word, given to the unbeliever that does not resist the Word, works in their heart and mind and they come to believe in Jesus and convert to Christ, but that’s not all, the word continues to develop faith as the Word continues in their life.

God’s grace saves, but his grace does so much more than save, it transforms, protects, and develops and grows faith and hope, and life.

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Getting Into This Grace, Part 12

      A family from a remote area was making their first visit to a big city. They checked in to a grand hotel and stood in amazement at the impressive sight. Leaving the reception desk they came to the elevator entrance. They’d never seen an elevator before, and just stared at it, unable to figure out what it was for.

An old lady hobbled towards the elevator and went inside. The door closed. About a minute later, the door opened and out came a stunningly good-looking young woman.

The Dad couldn’t stop staring. Without turning his head he patted his son’s arm and said, “Go get your mother, son.”

It’s just a joke, but transformation is what we’re dealing with today. Not just change, but more than change, transformation, metamorphosis; the conversion of our hearts and minds and souls.

That’s where Paul takes us in Romans. After receiving God’s grace there is still the struggle of living in a holy manner. In Romans 7, Paul discussed the difficulty of receiving grace and not living by grace. “I do the things I don’t want to do and I don’t do the things I know I should do.” As long as we continue to live in the flesh, we will have that struggle. What’s the solution?

Let’s start with God and the beginning of all things by going back to creation. God made everything and this is God’s estimation of it:

“God saw all that he had made, and it was very good” Genesis 1:31. (NIV)

“It may seem obvious at first, but this statement is actually quite radical. By claiming that creation is good, the Bible places itself in contrast to a number of religions and philosophies that hold that this earth upon which we live is, at best, irrelevant, or, at worst, evil.

Biblical faith however, declares that the world God has made is good. Creation is very good, not evil.  It is the environment in which God created us to prosper and thrive” (Mark Sayers, The Vertical Self); this is the home that God created for us to live in with him and the whole of creation. Yet, sin removed us from the good and moved us into the bad and as Romans 9:19-22 tells us, the creation is suffering because of human sin as well.

Things were good until sin entered the world and corrupted everything. As we said before, you weren’t born with sin. Sin is not your natural way it’s not in your spiritual or physical DNA. You didn’t inherit it from Adam and Eve, but like Adam and Eve, you had a choice and you chose wrong. You sinned by choice and that is how sin entered the world and how sin became a part of your life, by each and every individual’s choice.

In Christ, through his death and resurrection and by means of your faith, you are freed from sin, and set apart able to live a holy and righteous life pleasing to God. But until we get to heaven, we still struggle with temptation and sin and don’t always accomplish the will of God in holiness.

Paul gives us the solution beginning with chapter 12 through the rest of the book. It’s here that he gets really practical.

CLIMB UP AND BECOME A SACRIFICE – Romans 12:1 “

We are to be “living sacrifices.” That’s kind of a contradictory term. The sacrifice is usually killed and prepared before it is sacrificed. The life of the sacrifice was the sacrifice. Its death was the substitution for the person’s sins it was sacrificed for. But we are to be living sacrifice. What’s that mean?

Begin with this thought: Reconciliation rarely occurs without sacrifice. By giving his one and only Son, God took the initiative in healing our broken relationship with him. He made the supreme sacrifice for us that we might be reconciled to him. Jesus’ death was the sacrifice for your sins, yet he lives. His death makes it possible for you to be saved, to be reconciled to God, to fix the broken tie that sin caused between you and God.

Remember, you were dead in your sins, but in Christ you have life. You were dead and buried in baptism and coming out of the water came out alive, reconciled to God. You are now his child, you have been saved by God’s grace. You gave your life to God; you are a living sacrifice, pure and holy – holy and pleasing to God (as the verse tells us).

That is a decision, an attitude, and a determination.

You can’t be a living sacrifice unless you choose to be. It is your decision. You have to choose to be holy to God. As we will see, he will enact the transformation with your decision and your effort and you will become this living sacrifice and will show God’s holiness.

Unless you are holy, you cannot be a sacrifice to God . . . at all. We see this in the story of Israel. God called his people for a special purpose.  Israel was to be a holy people whose embodiment of God’s values would speak to the nations of the world. He called Israel to be a living example of the way he wanted the world to be.

Christians, the church is spiritual Israel and we have the same purpose in this world, to embody God’s holiness as a witness to the world. Yet, we have to decide to become what God has wanted to do in us all along.

At the same time you have to want to be that way. You can decide something all day long, but if you don’t want to do it or be that way, you either won’t or your heart won’t be in it. And if you do it, you are just going through the motions. It has little or no meaning to you.  You’re just “doing it,” not “being it.”

Your attitude, your motivation matters. It is so much more than doing the right thing, it is having right attitude, the correct motivation just like the Sermon on the Mount teaches us. See if these words capture the right attitude?

  • Thankfulness and Gratefulness
  • Joy
  • Peace
  • Harmony
  • Hope
  • Mission and ministry
  • Calling
  • Who you are in Christ

And with the elements of choice, attitude, and determination to become who God wants you to be and calls you to be, while he works in you – you also work through his strength, his gifts, his Spirit, and as we shall see from verse 2, his word.

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Whoa, It’s Been Awhile

I just realized it’s been over two months since the last post. Been busy with family and friends in the hospital, connection problems that are solved now, and just plain busy keeping the yard up and preaching.

It’s time to finish the Romans study, “Grace rests easily where sin once sat.” There are other things to discuss and develop, so I hope you’re ready, I’m getting excited again.

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God’s Taking Care of Me (Romans Pt. 11)

I like to win. I am very competitive and I really like victory. When it really matters, I will do whatever I need to do (within the rules) to win, to overcome my opponent, to conquer them.

I don’t know if it is that I’m a guy and guys have that tendency, or if it is cultural conditioning and participating in sports, or if it’s just me, but I like to win.

I won when God saved me. I became victorious over sin, over temptation, over death, over everything that puts me in the state of being lost. In Christ, I am a conqueror. The only thing I really did was believe in Christ, repent my sins, confess that he is God’s Son and give my life to him. He saved me. I recognized that the war was going to be won by the forces of heaven with Jesus the victor and I went over to the other side, to Jesus’ side.

I have been given and I have received God’s grace.

In the 4/4/11 post  https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/figuring-out-what-romans-828-means/ , we discussed how Romans 8:28 is misused. Essentially, people take the verse and believe it claims that they will overcome in every circumstance and situation because they are in Christ, yet, it is not about living a victorious life and all about overcoming what sin had done to us in the first place. Sin had separated us from the love of God and now that we have taken Christ as our Savior, we have become conquerors.

And so God has done some important and incredible stuff, both before creation and now.

1st – Before creation he determined that when we accept Christ, that we will become like Christ is being judged sinless and that we will be (as Romans 12:1-2 says) transformed by the renewing of our mind. He already renewed our soul, now the ongoing transformation of making us Christ-like continues in this life – Rom. 8:29-30

2nd – When Paul tells us that God is for us, we are not talking about God cheering us on from the sidelines, or even as a coach. He is for us in that he gave us life. He provided life through Jesus’ death and resurrection and puts eternal life into us when we accept Christ and are baptized. So he makes our souls right (Paul uses the word justified) – Rom. 8:31-32

3rd – Because we are judged innocent of sin with Jesus’ blood covering us for the sake of forgiveness, then no can bring a charge of guilt against us because God has forgiven us. We are even told that God erases our sins from the book that records what we’ve done in this life. They are no longer recognized because when God looks at us he sees Jesus’ blood covering us – Rom. 8:33-34

So, who shall separate us from the love of Christ. Sin can’t because it has been removed and forgotten. Satan can’t because God doesn’t recognized that we are sinners any more. Nothing outside of ourselves can separate the faithful Christian from God’s love (which implies God wanting to and giving us salvation).

In Christ, you are in good shape.

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Figuring Out What Romans 8:28 Means

A lot of people go through life with the philosophy, “keep a good thought.” If you have positive thinking and look for the good in everything, then you can handle anything.

Romans 8:28 is often perceived in about the same way as if it is the spiritual version of” keep a good thought.”

A simple examination of the immediate passage that these verses are a part of should correct a lot of the misconceptions people have about these Biblical statements.

So we come back to Romans 8:28 which says, “And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.”

A lot of people think this means that since I love God he will fix everything just fine.

Like a football player, a little undersized and short on experience going up against a player who even has muscles in his ear lobes going into the game saying to himself, “I can do all things through Him who gives me strength.” Or the person who has been asked to do a job they have no clue about doing, “I can do all things through him who gives me strength.”

Most people apply this thought and the common interpretation when relationships break, jobs are lost, the house goes into foreclosure, and so many more situations. But is that what this passage means? Not really. There are problems with this particular interpretation.

The problems are:

  1. This is pretty naïve. The good thought – God will work it all together for my benefit. The rest of scripture doesn’t bear this out. That would mean that everything has a good and positive result in the end when it doesn’t. The Bible actually teaches us that we will have problems and many will come from our own decisions, some will come because we stand by our faith in Christ.
  2. Also, the context doesn’t imply it either. The section of verses Romans 8:28 is a part of is going to give us a different view of what God does. It is for our benefit but not exactly how a lot of people take it to mean.
  3. What do you do with it when God doesn’t work it together for your benefit, for your good? Because it doesn’t always happen this way.

Listen to Tim Geddert’s testimony about his misinterpretation of this verse:

“That is how I once memorized Romans 8:28 many years ago. It has often been a word of hope for me, assuring me that all things, even “bad” things, “work out” for people who love God. In fact there was a time when I interpreted this verse to mean that there really are no “bad things” that happen to believers. If things seem bad, but really serve to fulfill God’s good purposes, then even these things are ultimately good. I guess at the time it did not seem unjust to me that only those who love God are promised the benefit of “everything working out.” Nor was I troubled by the fact that I often did not see the “bad things” magically transformed into “good things.  I once thought Romans 8:28 was about “all things working out”. . . ”

Actually many have found the sweeping assertion, “all things work together for good,” difficult to believe. Faced with sufferings and catastrophic experiences of life, many believers and even Christian leaders have found it difficult to accept this assertion. In relation to the current War America is involved in, a prominent preacher designated Romans 8:28 as “the hardest verse to believe.” While willing to admit that the countless ravages that have occurred to the human race are the logical consequences of mankind’s sin and rebellion against God, many a devout believer, when some shattering experience has befallen him, has cried out in confusion, “Why does God allow this to happen to me?” How can this kind of experience be reconciled with Roman 8:28?

What is the book of Romans about? The core aspects of Romans is about your salvation, the grace of God in your life, and whether you are a Jew or a Gentile, God has provided salvation to both because all people have sinned and need salvation.  Paul explains:

  • Justification by faith, just like Abraham
  • Peace with God through justification
  • Death came through Adam and life came through Jesus
  • We are dead to sin and alive to Christ
  • That we have and live life in the Spirit

Romans 8:18 – 39

Let me ask you, what is in store for the believer? The answers are all related.

  • Heaven
  • Our glorification in Christ
  • Eternity with God

Our eternal glory that we like to read about in Revelation 21. God and his people together and every tear wiped away. Your back won’t hurt any more.  Your illnesses will never affect you longer. You won’t have another broken relationship again. Heaven where we love God in person, where his glory is experienced first-hand.

We are here, on this earth where sin has taken hold and brought about separation from God and even affected the existence we have here. Not only did sin introduce spiritual pain and death, it introduced problems to the physical universe; to our bodies, to our planet, and probably to the whole universe and maybe every universe.

Yet in this suffering, God plans to redeem not just the lost, he also intends to redeem the world and Paul notes how our world is “groaning” under the effects of sin, and the suffering we endure here is nothing in comparison to what will be revealed in us.

  • 1 Corinthians 15:35-56 tells about our resurrection bodies. Verse 49 states, “just as we have borne the like of the earthly man so shall we bear the likeness of the man from heaven.”
  • And John says in 1 John 3:2, “But we know that when he appears, we shall be like him.”

I get that when we get to heaven and receive the glorification God will give us, we shall be like Jesus.  Whatever Jesus is like, what he looks like we will too!  Peter, James, and John got a glimpse of this on the mountain when Jesus was transfigured.

You get to glow! That’s pretty cool in my book.

While we struggle through life now, we have the Holy Spirit who is the seal of our salvation.  But he does more than just seal the deal in each believer’s life he helps us in our weakness. He intercedes on our behalf to God. He does it according to God’s will but he brings our cares before God and pleads with him on our behalf in ways we can’t. He expresses what we cannot.  He displays our needs, our words, and emotions with words and feeling we can’t even hint at.

This is all while we wait for glory, for Jesus’ loving return to bring us our reward in our faith.

Because we know that God is getting the whole of what we are pleading with him about because the Spirit who knows our heart and minds and the heart and mind of God is presenting our plights to God, we can then know that God is working for our good.

  • What good?
  • How is God working?
  • What’s this really about?

What is the good that God wants to do in the world? He wants to save the world, to bring them into the likeness of his Son, Jesus Christ.

“God isn’t slow in keeping his promises as some count slowness, but patient toward you not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance” 2 Peter 3:9. God wants to save people and we know that salvation is through faith in Jesus.

Look at 2 Corinthians 3:18-19.

Paul is revealing how much greater the glory is in the new covenant than was in the old covenant.  And that those who still live by the old covenant have veiled themselves to the glory God intends in the new covenant for them. And then he says that we are “being transformed into the likeness of Christ.”

This new covenant in Christ’s blood, the covenant of grace, the covenant which saves us is about our becoming like Christ, even now, while we live this life.

So, God is working together in our lives to bring about this transformation.

Romans 8:28-30

Long before God created the world, he fully intended that those who are in Christ, those who have accepted him as Lord and Savior will become like his son. He is the heir, but God makes the believer an heir, we become “children of God.” We get the inheritance we already talked about; we are glorified, we get to go to heaven, we get to spend the time with God in person.

Conforming to the image of Christ is the good that God is working together with us, in us, bringing it about.

As long as we hold strong to Christ, we remain in him, we continue to grow into and conform to his likeness we will continue to have our eternal hope.

That’s why Paul says, “If God is for us, who can be against us” in verse 30. That is why he says that we are More than conquerors through him (Christ) who loved us” in verse 37. That is why life and death, angels and demons, the present and the future, powers, even height and depth “nor anything in all of creation can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus” in verses 38 and 39.

All of this is true when we are in Christ.

I am finding a promise here in Romans 8:28 that tells me what God is doing together with my soul, making me Christ-like. I am involved. I know that God works in circumstances and even guides us through those difficult and troubling circumstances, but he didn’t promise to make them good, not in the physical-material sense.

  • He didn’t say I’ll turn your job loss into a better job yet to come.
  • He didn’t say I’ll make your body whole so you won’t have to suffer sickness or injury.
  • He didn’t say I’ll heal your broken heart by bringing someone new to love that is better than you’ve known before.
  • He didn’t promise anything like that.  Though he could do stuff like.

What God has promised is according to what salvation is about. He intends to bring us into Christ’s likeness.

Verse 32 has become a very happy verse for me.

“He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all – how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things?”

Is your identity in Christ? If so, God is working in you to make you into the likeness of Christ and specifically heirs, subjects of eternal life.

I’m longing for heaven.

At the same time, your trust in God and his word are the tools to help you spiritually, emotionally, and practically through whatever struggle you have. Though Romans 8:28 isn’t the cure-all scripture many take it to be, faith does rely upon God to strengthen and support in good and bad times, when hope is blinded and when life is good. Always trust God, rely on his Spirit, and seek guidance from the Bible, God will see you through it though things may not turn how you wish them too.

God is good and faithful and through your faith in Christ he is your life.

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Where Grace is Sitting

We’ve had several discussions about sin and grace in the book of Romans. Following are links progressively through our discussion.

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2010/12/07/grace-rests-easily-where-sin-once-sat/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2010/12/10/the-uncomfortable-truth/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2010/12/22/no-room-for-sin/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2010/12/27/a-convenient-truth/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/01/02/god-gets-amnesia/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/01/12/dreaming-that-im-free/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/01/21/not-disappointed-romans-pt-7/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/02/10/gettin-wet-in-gods-grace-romans-pt-8/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/02/16/am-i-really-like-this-romans-pt-9/

https://blogthechurch.wordpress.com/2011/02/24/im-free-romans-pt-10/

We will be continuing with the later half of Romans chapter 8.

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Boy Am I Blessed!

It is not hard to become a Christian. You hear the Gospel of Jesus and when you believe the Gospel, you have faith in Christ (Romans 10:14-17). Then when you have met the conditions (faith; Romans 10:9-10; repentance; Acts 2:38; confession: Romans 10:9-10, & baptism; Acts 2:38; 1 Peter 3:21), then you are saved, God has saved you because you have identified with Christ through his death (that’s what immersion is for, cf., Romans 6:1-6). That’s the easy part, knowing what to do, but, it can be more difficult for some people to come to the point of belief, or repentance. It can be difficult to let go of what we already know and keep ourselves living in the that way which the Bible describes as sinful and worldly and idolatry.

Once I am saved, when I have become a Christian, well things are new. The Bible even calls it a new life (Romans 12:2; 2 Corinthians 4:16). I am not who I was. I have a brand new life, I start over. If I simply keep living the way I had before, then I am not different just a little older. But with salvation in Christ, with the Holy Spirit in my life, with God’s Word the Bible leading me, then I am being transformed, renewed (Rom. 12:2) into the likeness of Christ.

At least one time, when there was a huge crowd of people, Jesus taught them. In Matthew 5, he was on a mountain in Galilee and began to teach the crowds. He began with the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-16).

Each “Beatitude” begins with “Blessed are…” meaning, “joyful are those who….”

This is what it is like to live in Christ, to be a Christian, to have life.

  • It is a joyful thing to realize you are poor in your spirit and you need God. It is joyful because God’s kingdom is in us; Mt. 5:3
  • It is a joyful thing to mourn that you are a sinner, because God’s salvation will bring you comfort; Mt. 5:4
  • It is a joyful thing to be meek. Gentle in character but firm in conviction; you will “inherit the earth,” fill it with joy; Mt. 5:5
  • It is a joyful thing to hunger and thirst for righteousness, because you will have; Mt. 5:6
  • It is a joyful thing to be merciful, you’ll get mercy back and from God; Mt. 5:7
  • It is a joyful thing to have a pure heart, you are going to get to see God because of it; Mt. 5:8
  • It is joyful when you are a peacemaker, that’s what the children of God do; Mt. 5:9
  • It is a joyful thing when people persecute you because of your righteousness, it means you are in the kingdom and people who hate God hate Christ in you and will try to insult and stop you; Mt. 5:10-13

This is spiritual of course. It plays out here in the material world with the sense that God’s kingdom is expressed in and through your life.

This is the character of those who are saved. Not one or another of the Beatitudes, but all of them together. It’s like the fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22). It’s not one or two things, it’s all of them at once that make up the produce of your life.

Why am I blessed? I am blessed because I have salvation, I have God in my life and Christ is leading me by the means of his Spirit. I have heaven and a great reward, now and in the future (John 10:10, “life abundant”).

Boy am I blessed!

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